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A lot of other professions use the term ‘Architect,’ for many its sacrilegious. I have mixed opinions on the ‘titles issue’ as there are more pressing matters facing the profession. However, this is a great way to lighten the mood. In a prior post, In the Game , I offered up some suggestions for us architects to join in and play the game. I’m going to keep pilfering other professions titles and terminology and stay in the game… as the kids say, “Don’t hate the playa, hate da game!” They still say that, right… right? Thanks to Ron Lincoln for playing along and providing the additional titles.

 

 

2015-01-27_blog_image_the name game mba

 

 

2015-01-27_blog_image_the name game md

 

 

2015-01-27_blog_image_the name game dds

 

Have any to add? Post them in the comments section; if I get enough I’ll make up some more graphics.

 

 

Design On,

 

 

 

Keith Palma, NCARB, LEED AP, MD, DDS, MBA

 


photos from photostream on FLICKR and have been used under the creative commons license, in order erik ERXON , Herry Lawford, and  Matthew Burpee


General graphic layout inspired by Jody Brown at Coffee With an Architect.

2014-05-13_blog_image_competitions 1Within the architecture profession, design competitions have a love hate relationship. Many architects either love them or hate them. Me, I don’t cut it so black and white, I prefer an off gray stance. I don’t enter many design competitions, perhaps a future post as to why. However, when I do, I look at them from my own ** insert pun ** perspective and I win every competition I enter.

Every.

Single.

One.

How? Simple, I enter them with a specific challenge for myself to achieve. I don’t care about ‘winning’ in terms of Charlie Sheen, or the competitions definition of winning. Sure, it’d be great to win and receive the accolades from peers, or a quart of tiger’s blood, but I’m in it for more than that. I win by using competitions as exercises to further my knowledge of the architecture profession and/or add new design tools to my arsenal. There are two, and only two criteria to meet if you want to guarantee a win- and in reality one of them is optional.

The two critical tips to win every competition you enter:

1. There needs to be an entry fee. It’ll force upon you responsibility and commitment. If you’re anything like me, you expect to get something out of the monies you pay- I’m looking right at you AIA, sorry, that’s another post.

2. You need to commit to learning a new technique, trying new software, testing a new concept, investigating a new material or new usage of a typical material, etc. the key here is ‘new’ as the only way to win is doing something new.

You can win without meeting tip number 1. However, your winnings will be greater if you do. Keep in mind, there is no way to win if you don’t adhere to tip number 2

2014-05-13_blog_image_competitions 3One of my most recent projects was the design of a new residential house. The clients are great and it’s been a fun project. The design was done via SketchUp and the design package was presented via renders right out of SketchUp. The graphic results for the schematic proposal were good. At the schematic stage, I try not to get caught up in materials and color selections- I want clients to focus on form, massing, and layout. I’ve used SketchUp for several years, the renders are good but a bit cartoonish. If you’d like to learn the basics of using SketchUp, check out my post SketchUp 101. I’ve tried a few other rendering plug-ins with Sketchup in the past, while the results were better than the standard Sketchup, they were cumbersome to achieve. I knew there were better Sketchup plug-ins. Time to go win a design competition.

My local chapter of the AIA was having their annual design awards competition, a perfect one to enter. As previously mentioned, there was an entry fee and the new software I was going to learn was Maxwell Render. I wanted to learn a new software to enhance the Sketchup renders. In addition, I was looking for a technique to better render grass, and Maxwell fit the bill on both counts. The free version of Maxwell is a plug-in that runs within Sketchup. While you’re limited to certain functions and output resolutions, it greatly enhances renderings of your Sketchup models. I chose Maxwell because Evan Troxel raves about it and if he does, trust me it’s got to be good. So Maxwell it was. I won’t go into specifics about the usage of Maxwell, perhaps a future post, but honestly you’re better off checking out Evan’s get Method site.

Here are some of the images created- the original SketchUp image is followed  with the Maxwell Render below. Keep in mind these were created from one SketchUp model with minor tweaking in Maxwell. The people, trees, and sky were done in Photoshop:

2014-05-13_blog_image_competitions 2

 

So there you go, my latest win at a design competition. I won by learning a new software and technique. I was extremely happy with the results and haven’t even begun experimenting with Maxwell materials… maybe I’ll save that for my next winning entry. If you care to forgo an entry fee, be sure to check out Bob Borson’s Life of an Architect annual Playhouse Design Competition, its for a great cause.

So go out there and win yourself a design competition, you’ll be happy you did!

 

 

Design On,

** Seriously… you’ll win… do it!

A few weeks ago I posted Crickets; it addressed my frustration with potential clients being unresponsive. However, I just can’t let it rest. As an architect I’m always looking to solve the problem at hand and make my client’s responsibilities as easy and efficient as possible. As such, I’ve created a [un]Response Form that can be left with potential clients to review and choose their response. I’ll even go so far as to provide a self-addressed stamped envelope for return of the [un]Response Form. Hopefully, this will elicit a few more responses. I present the latest in my library of forms:

 

2013-11-21_blog_image_unresponsive

 

Download a PDF for your own use ->[un]Response Form

 

Design On,

** the form is provided free of charge, and you assume all liability and comical consequences- however, at any point in the future I can decide to charge $79.99 for a one time use of the form… enjoy! 

A lot of other professions use the term ‘Architect,’ for many it’s blasphemy. Me, I’m going to start pilfering other professions titles and terminology and get in the game… as the kids say, “Don’t hate the playa, hate da game!” They still say that, right… right?

 

 

JD

 

 

IT

 

 

PHD

 

 

CPA

 

 

scd

 

On second thought, one of these may not work so well. Have any to add? Put them in the comments section below. If I get enough I’ll make up some more graphics!

 

Design On,

 

 

 

Keith Palma, AIA, NCARB, LEED AP, JD, IT Specialist, PHD, CPA, Sc. D.

 


All photos are from Matthew Burpee’s photostream on FLICKR and have been used under the creative commons license.


General graphic layout inspired by Jody Brown at Coffee With an Architect.

Henry Ford is credited with saying “History is more or less bunk. It’s tradition. We don’t want tradition. We want to live in the present, and the only history that is worth a tinker’s damn is the history that we make today.” I think Henry was wrong, I mean really ‘bunk?’ That’s a harsh word. I accept my own challenge and shall disprove Henry by providing images from Architectvral Graphic Standards, Third Edition, published 1946. These images clearly show history is indeed not bunk:

 

2012-10-10_1349902217
“Trust me; the trunk needs to be this high to stuff the remainder of the torso in.”

 

 

photo2
Proper clearances required to wave your arms up in the air like you just don’t care.

 

 

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Vertical dimension required for a bar crawl. Also applies to dropping to knees with chest pains

 

 

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“One permit please… seriously Mr. Plan Reviewer? You have no idea what the intent of the code is, do you?” This diagram is a good example of how if you piss off the plan reviewer he/she will stand up…and then walk away.

 

 

photo
Sadly, the Macarena has been around much longer than anyone cares to admit.

 

 

photo4
Diagram indicating the rigidity of an Enginneer

 

 

photo5
Diagram indicating the initial client-architect meeting. White outline portrays clients retraction after architect discusses that he wants to actually be compensated. (client on L architect on R).

 

 

photo3
Excellent diagram of the Architect-AIA relationship.

 

See what I did there with the title? Pretty clever. Okay, maybe Henry was right.

 

Design On,

** Bar crawl graphic assumes an average male of average height with average beer tastes.