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My goal at the beginning of 2014 was to gain more exposure for Architect’s Trace and reduce time spent on social media. Seems like a contradictory goal, but I know it can be done… I just took it to an extreme the second half of 2014. There were 23 new posts and 72 images uploaded on Architect’s Trace in 2014. In 2013 there were 41 new posts and 145 images uploaded. While the posts/ images are down for 2014, I attribute that to those being so awesome that I had to re-post them in 2014 as well as more quality posts!

I no longer look at myself as The Poster, I consider myself a blogger now. However, I’m still not sure what that means. Do I offer T-Shirts? Do I ‘sell’ something? Do I create a podcast? I’m not sure. A major benefit of writing this blog is the dialogue with peers and friendships that have come about as such. I’ve even done some consulting work with those ‘met’ online. However, it’s the dialogue fostered and conversations had that are far more valuable to me than the actual post that sparked such. I use this blog as a creative outlet for myself and to educate as to what it is we architect’s do and how we do it- hopefully for 2015 I will continue such.

2015-01-05_blog image_2014 year in review

The friendly stats helper interns (yes you’re still an intern no matter what AIA/ NCARB say and that’s okay… deal with it) at WordPress prepared a 2014 annual report for Architect’s Trace blog. I’ll admit that I don’t pay much attention to the stats of my blog, but it’s clear that I’ve out-performed last year’s.

An excerpt from the interns report:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 30,000 times in 2014. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 11 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

I think they could pack twice as many people into the opera house if Frank Gehry did a spoken word performance comprised of “98%… modern architecture… shit” and flipped off the audience over and over. The number of performances could then be cut to 6 to equal the number of my 2014 blog viewers. I’m good with Architect’s Trace headlining the Sydney Opera house…however, I’d like to go on prior to Frank pissing everyone off… wait, what… okay I got off on a tangent there. Compared to the 30,000 views in 2013, that’s a 200% increase- I’m proud of that number!

 

sydney

Click the link to learn more about the Sydney Opera House

A few more intern provided facts about Architect’s Trace:

Busiest Day was January 16th with 2,975 views. The most popular post that day was SketchUp 101 Wait, 2,975 views? That’s about 10% of my total views for the year, not sure how that happened but I’ll take it! While awesome, it boggles me and I need to figure out how to re-create and maintain such viewership… perhaps I should consider more ‘how to’ SketchUp posts.

Visitors came from 162 different countries, up 31 countries from 2013, BOOM! This was the year I cracked into Papua New Guinea, Iceland heard me last year and I’ve got 4 followers from there as well! Most visitors came from The United States. India and the U.K. were not far behind… must’ve been all the business cards I ‘lost’ while travelling in London last year. I’ve always wanted to visit Italy, seems I have 611 people I can ask lodging from, someone’s got to yes.

Top 5 Posts of 2014 were 1) SketchUp 101 2) Dear Architects, I am sick of your shit 3) ArchitecTypes- what kind of architect are you? part 1 of 4 4) What an Architect Does 5) Design Process 103- Design Development. There were some good posts in 2014 and the most read posts discussed how and what we architects do. These posts have been read by both potential clients and fellow architects. I’d like to think that I’m educating others on the architecture profession and not just taking up bandwidth.

1280px-Gehry_House_-_Image01Click the link to learn more about Frank Gehry

I don’t ask anything from my readers, however, for 2015 I’d ask that if you don’t already write a blog, write one. Write about your passions, your personal life, anything that interests you. The people you’ll engage with and discussions that follow will far outweigh any fears you may have about writing a blog. Don’t wait start a blog, in the words of Dr. Seuss:

“You can get so confused
that you’ll start in to race
down long wiggled roads at a break-necking pace
and grind on for miles across weirdish wild space,
headed, I fear, toward a most useless place.
The Waiting Place…”

I’d like to specifically thank Lee Calisti, author of think | architect, Marica McKeel, author of The Architect’s Notebook, and Mark LePage of Entrepreneur Architect, they were my top referring sites for 2014, thank you! If you’re not already following Lee, Marica, and Mark you should be, they each have great blogs! In fact, I re-blog many of Lee’s posts, he’s smarter than me and can explain things much clearer than I. Architect’s Trace was also found by people searching for ‘B-Vent,’ I’m not sure what to think of that so that’s all I’ll say.

My main goal of this blog is to trace my experiences as an architect- how it a/effects me, my design ideologies, the built environ, and all I encounter. Hopefully, others along a similar path, or those just curious about architects/architecture, can benefit from my trace(s). Along the way this blog as become more than me being an architect and architecture. It’s been a vehicle to ‘meet’ others and be part of a larger conversation. It’s been about my trial and tribulations as the best dad ever, trying to be the best husband ever, and well, just being part of the human race. Judging those goals I consider my blog a success!

So what now, a grand re-vamp to the blog? I don’t think so, I’m happy with the blog as it currently stands. Sure, I’d like more exposure and I’ll work on that. This year will be a challenge, I want to gain exposure of Architect’s Trace at the same time I want to reduce time spent on social media- [Dis]Connect. Perhaps a follow up post to clarify my intentions. A new web site is in the works for my firm and how I’ll integrate this blog into the site is yet unknown but a task that will be accomplished.

Of course like all architects, I’d like more work in 2015, but I’d also like to just be happy and content with where I am and how I got here. To my readers, thanks for being part of the journey and if you’re not already following Architect’s Trace, I hope that you do and become part of this Trace, cheers and here’s to a great 2015 and this thing we call Architecture, I mean LIFE!

Design On,

 

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In our never-ending quest to demystify the process of an architect, we’re once again lifting the veil of secrecy. Below is another example of what you may hear from an architect, as well as what’s actually going through the architects mind.

 

2014-09-30_blog_image_architect realities no 9

 

Be sure to check out our Architect Realities and Client Realities.

 

Design On,

** I don’t think this, it’s just what I hear other architects think.

 

2014-05-20_blog_image_the break up part 1

After 14 years or so the AIA and I have broken up… seems I’ve put on a few extra pounds and the AIA has… well… they’ve gotten to be high maintenance. The magic is gone. No matter what I do it’s not enough. We’ll always have… hmm… not sure what we’ll always have. We did have some good times though, didn’t we? Perhaps we can rekindle our relationship in the future (I left a turtleneck in their closet ** air thumbs up! **). For now though, and for the sake of the design, we have parted. A follow-up post in the future will cover more specifics. For now I give you some revised lyrics from the Counting Crows Mr. Jones (VH1 Storytellers version):

1 qoute

 

 

So you wanna be an AIA Member,

Well listen now to what I say,

Just get a bank account,

And take some time, and learn how to pay,

Just learn how to pay.

 

Well I was down at the New AIA Headquarters,

Just staring at this yellow painted gable,

Mr. AIA strikes up a conversation,

With the black haired flamenco drafter,

You know, she dances while his father pays the dues,

She’s suddenly beautiful,

And we all want something beautiful,

And I wish I was beautiful la la la.

 

I’ll call-up Mies- come on,

Show me some of them contemporary designs,

And pass me a contract Mr. AIA,

Believe in me, come on,

Help me believe in AIA,

‘Cause I wanna be someone who believes.

 

Mr. AIA and me,

Tell each other fairy tales,

We stare at the beautiful architecture,

“She’s looking at you, no no, she’s looking at me,”

Standing in this permit office,

Coming through in stereo,

When everybody loves modernism,

You should never be lonely.

 

I wanna paint myself an outfit,

I wanna paint myself in black and charcoal and grey and dark grey,

All the beautiful colors are very, very meaningful,

Yeah, you know black it’s my favorite color,

I just, wear it everyday,

But if I knew Corbu,

I would buy myself a dark grey mock turtleneck and pay.

 

Mr. AIA and me,

Look into the future,

We stare at all the beautiful Architecture,

“She’s looking at you, I don’t think so, she’s looking at me,”

Presenting to this Planning Commision,

I bought myself this black suit and tie,

Man, when everybody loves me,

I hope I’ll never get lonely.

 

I wanna be a lion, I know, I know-

Everybody wants to pass as cats,

We all wanna be big, big, big, big, big starchitects,

Yeah but then we get second thoughts about that,

So believe in me, man, I don’t believe in anything,

And I wanna be someone to believe,

You should not believe in post modernism.

 

Mr. AIA and me,

Stumbling through the city grid,

We stare at all the beautiful Architecture,

She’s perfect for you, there’s got to be someone for me,

I wanna be Richard Neutra,

Mr. AIA wishes he was someone just a little more, you know flexible,

Man, when everybody loves you and dues are so high,

Sometimes, that’s just about as fucked up as you can be,

 

Can’t you hear me ’cause I’m screaming

But I did not pay my dues this year,

Oh, don’t wake me ’cause I was dreaming

And I make you worth it again today.

 

Mr. AIA and me, we don’t see each other much… anymore.

2 qoute


 

 

Design On,

** The acoustic version will be awesome!  

Thinking about starting your own firm or going out on your own as a sole practioner? If so, there are some basics you should be reminded of when starting your firm. Keep in mind, this is not an all-encompassing post and you should consult legal advice as you feel necessary. I’ve worked in the architecture profession for over 20 years, the past 14 years as a licensed architect and the past 5 years as running my own architecture firm.  I’d like to think I’ve learned a few things over the years that are worth sharing. Below is a business outline that I feel is crucial to starting your own firm. I’ll be honest, I haven’t followed it to the letter. I won’t say which I haven’t, but I can say I regret not having done some…vague enough… don’t you do the same.

Strategic Planning

Establish your Vision, Mission, and Values. Going through a strategic planning process will help you in defining your goals, as well as provide the framework to create a specific business plan to achieve them. It will also help you establish and build your unique ‘Brand’ and guide your day-to-day decision making. A situations arise, or goals change, refer to your strategic plan for guidance and/or to revise as needed. Your strategic plan is fluid and it should be revised as needed, at least once a year minimum. The basics your plan should contain are the following:

    1. Vision: How do you see your firm in 2, 3, or 5 years?
      1. How much revenue and profit would you like or need to be successful?
      2. Do you plan on having employees, if so how many?
      3. What project types will you serve? Geographic location(s) you will serve?
      4. What services will you offer? Will they be direct or subcontracted? (architecture, landscape architecture, interior design, graphic design, civil, MEP, or structural engineering…)
    2. Mission: What is your key purpose?
      1. Why do you want to do this work?
      2. What do you want to be known for? (unique design solutions, traditional architecture, contemporary architecture, great service, technical abilities, LEED solutions…)
      3. What makes you and your firm unique?
      4. Try and develop a benefit statement or slogan for your Key Purpose.
    3. Values: What are your core principles regarding design and business?

2014-03-11_blog_image_firm advice a

I don’t think your strategic plan should be shared with your clients or posted on your web site. The purpose of the plan is to guide you, not as ‘fluff’ to market or a sales attempt.  That doesn’t mean write it and just forget about it. To be purposeful your plan needs to be simple and employed as framework for you to reference and guide you as to why you’re doing what you’re doing. Bob Borson has some great advice in his Mission Statements post. We all want to be the best and offer the best services, we don’t need to tell clients that… but we do need a plan as to how we’re going to achieve.

Legal Entity

Most business entities can be set up rather easily and with little to no assistance. However, it’s best to consult with an attorney to discuss what type of business structure will fit your needs the best. If you’re not comfortable doing so, a business attorney can also assist you in setting up the legal entity. There are several legal corporation structures, for example:

    1. Sole Proprietorship- personal exposure for all liabilities
    2. Partnership- personal exposure and possible control issues
    3. S Corporation- insulation from many liabilities, tax burden passes through to individual owners
    4. C Corporation- insulation from many liabilities, subject to corporate taxes, flexible
    5. Limited Liability Corporation or Professional Limited Liability Corporation- simple but has limitations

It’s best to consult an attorney and review these, as well as other, options available to you. Meeting with an attorney for an hour is worth the cost and can save you a lot of hassle in the future.

Licensure

Make sure you are licensed in every state (or jurisdiction) that you are providing services. Many states require local licensure just to offer to provide architectural services. Be sure to review the specific requirements for each state prior to offering or providing services for clients or projects. Some states will also require your corporation be registered with the local Architecture Board and have a separate corporate seal and number than your personal architecture seal. Create a method for Continuing Education requirements and tracking for yourself and any other professional architects in your firm.

Insurance

There is a lot to cover when it comes to insurance… there’s Professional Liability Insurance, Errors and Omissions, General Liability Insurance, Property/Casualty, Workers Compensation, etc. Certain clients and projects will mandate what type and amounts of insurance you should carry. It’s best to find a reputable insurance broker and discuss your options with them.

Professional Relationships

Make sure to develop and maintain key relationships to assist you and your firm, i.e. banker, lawyer, finance and tax accountants, insurance brokers, vendors, engineering consultants, code officials, architects…

Startup Capital

Many firms start out as Sole Proprietors working out of their home and ‘bootstrapping’ it with little to no startup capital. Modative’s post, How to Start an Architecture Firm – Introduction, is a good read for how to start a firm via bootstrapping. However, if your goal is to start out a little ‘bigger,’ there’s more to consider. New firms rarely begin collecting revenue on day one, you should secure a source of funds required to cover your operating expenses in the time period between opening and receiving regular revenue to cover operating costs. Collection periods can vary significantly be sure your contract states your collection period. If you plan on starting ‘bigger,’ typically three to six months of operating expenses are needed prior to starting. Operating capital can come from many sources; personal funds, outside investors, personal credit, bank loan, SBA loan, etc.

    1. Establish your operating budget to determine your cash need
      1. Rent
      2. Space/building improvements
      3. Furniture
      4. Computer hardware
      5. Computer software
      6. Utilities, phone, internet, insurance, salaries, travel, etc.
      7. Marketing
      8. etc., etc., etc…..

Developing your Business

How are you going to market your services? How are you going to sell your services? How will you follow up with potential clients? Where will you ‘find’ clients? These all need to be answered if you want a chance at succeeding. Most architects starting out need to use work done while employed at a prior firm to market themselves. When doing so, be sure you have the firms consent, credit them as appropriate, and be honest with your particular responsibilities on that particular project. You’ll also need to continually develop your business and maintain the following:

    1. Marketing materials
    2. Identify potential clients and projects
    3. Website creation and maintenance
    4. Social media strategies (blog, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIN, etc.)

Handshake

Production Management

How are you going to execute your work? Numerous means/methods are required to complete a project, typically one individual does not possess all these skills. This is a positive to a partnership- one partner has a particular skill set that the other does not, together they complement each other’s skills. You’ll ned to develop a method for:

    1. Design
    2. Construction documenting
    3. Project management
    4. Construction administration
    5. Computer systems maintenance
    6. Printing
    7. Contract Management
    8. Fee proposals

Business Management

How are you going to deal with financial and accounting matters? Unless you’re on your own, its best to engage the services of a bookkeeper/tax accountant. They can provide you valuable advice on the financials of your firm as well as strategies to grow.

    1. Invoicing
    2. Financial statements
    3. Taxes
    4. Payroll and withholding

Fees and Services

How are you going to determine fees for your services? You should not be competing on the basis of price alone. However, one advantage of start-up/sole proprietor is that you will typically have a low overhead compared to larger established firms. However, position your firm relative to the competition such that you have a unique characteristic or advantage to sway clients to engage your services, it should not be because your fees are the lowest. If you compete on the basis of fees you’ll end up in bidding wars which will result in lower profit margins, which will ruin your firm quickly as you’ll always be trying to ‘make it up’ on the next project. When establishing your fees you need to know your actual Costs for delivering the services (salaries, overhead, etc.), your Selling point, or Price that will allow you to make a profit without compromising your services… read that last part again… “profit without compromising your services.” You should always strive for that.

Ready?

Based on the above information you should feel a bit more confident starting a firm with a plan in place. Keep in mind, it’s a loose plan that will evolve and change as the firm does, but it’s a plan none the less. Further great advice can be found on the Entrepreneur Architect web site by Mark LePage. site Above all it should be fun running/ owning your own firm. It’s hard work, sometimes frustrating work. You’ll rise and fall but you get credit for both, which is exciting! If you’re not having fun you should re-consider if running/owning your own firm is really what you wish to do.

I’ll close with one last key piece of advice, learn to know when you don’t know and ask for advice. So what tips/ advice do you have for starting and running your own firm, post them up in the comments below!

 

Design Business On,

** I’ll say it again, learn to know when you don’t know and ask for advice.

Lifer 2This is not an article by me. I read this article in inform Architecture+Design 2013: number six issue, a publication by the Virginia Society of the American Institute of Architects. Inform states that they encourage “open discussions of architecture and design.” I reached out to inform asking their permission to post their article on my blog, I never received a response. I hope they are okay with this. The link to the article on inform’s site is at the end of this post.

The opinions in the article are of Peter Gluck, founder of the design-build firm GLUCK+, he is spot on with his observations. Gluck raises some interesting points concerning architects conceding, or abandoning, their responsibilities during construction. This should be, if not already, on the minds of all architects. Gluck asserts, correctly, that the AEC profession must break down the separation between the design office and the construction trades. I strongly agree with his theory that there should be no separate ‘departments’ between designing and building or thinking and making. So have a read and post your comments below:

1 qoute

 

Peter Gluck founded the design-build firm GLUCK+ in New York City as a logical step toward delivering buildings that are built efficiently and well so that they adhere to the highest levels of life-cycle performance and aesthetic presence as prescribed in the design documents.

The strength of his firm’s work may lie in his breaking down the silos that separate the design office from the construction trades. The same project team of architects at GLUCK+ have a direct supervisory role at the building site, and in fact are in touch with the building trades before construction on site has begun. The theory is that there are no separate departments between designing and building, thinking and making. The pedagogy of the studio is that this integrated approach is the foundation for great buildings to be possible. This requires a shift in thinking.

“My pejorative position is that if you hire an architect who has been in the field for eight years, that is the point where he or she is resistant to change and tends to be defensive about being on a construction site and operating there.”

Design Forum XI

Gluck will join Ma Yansong, mad architecture, Beijing; Jeff Kovel, Skylab Architecture, Portland, Ore.; and Kai-Uwe Bergmann, BIG, Copenhagen, this coming April 11-12 in Charlottesville for the eleventh VSAIA Design Forum, “Dwelling: The Art of Living in Century XXI.”

In a recent interview with Inform, Gluck shared his personal views on three reasons architects have abandoned their responsibilities in the construction of their buildings.

Airs of a profession

In the late 19th century, architects wanted to distance themselves from being seen as tradesmen or craftsmen. They wanted to be seen as professionals. They brought academic pursuits to America from European institutions, notably the Ecole des Beaux Arts, and no longer aspired to talk tough and wear overalls on the job site.

Supervision: The Scarlett S

As litigation became more prevalent in the post-WWII boom, which lasted through the 1960s, lawyers began advising architects against supervision. Even though construction supervision is the one best way to know what happens on the project and is crucial to developing young talent, risk avoidance means that architects haven’t supervised job sites for several generations. By passing that responsibility over to others without the training and experience, risk avoidance became the greatest risk architects could possibly take.

Academy versus polytechnique

Architectural education has moved too far from reality. The thinking among many faculty is that true architectural education is purely academic, “and the polytechnique is for those who must build the building,” Gluck says. “So the third reason architects get separated from the construction world is that there is an attitude that they are artists, and that artists don’t dirty their hands with the real work. But, if you know anything about artists, you know that they have dirty hands.”

We have already seen the architect become the straw man—the target—when something goes wrong on the construction site. The architect’s role used to consist of schematic design, design development, construction documents, and supervision. If you believe, as Gluck does, that architects have already given up the supervision aspects, what is next? His answer is not to shy away, but to get involved in the process of translation from the abstract representation of an idea of a building to the full-size built version. He warns of the danger of depending on building information modeling (BIM) software as a panacea to replace the hard work of communication.

“Our process has been called analogue BIM because we have our people sitting next to each other doing the plumbing, structural, and mechanical drawings,” Gluck says. “The coordination is done humanistically—at the same time those people are design the architectural space.”2 qoute

If architects concede design development to some looming side profession of BIM managers (as so many conceded to construction managers in the 1970s and ’80s), “then architects will be relegated to making cartoons or sketches,” he warns.

 

 

 

The article can be found on inform’s web site here-> ‘Architects Are Not Cartoon Makers’

Design On,

** I wonder how much money cartoonists earn…

The New Year always brings with it resolutions, goals, renewed passions, reflections, and resumes… lots of resumes inquiring about employment. I try to respond to every inquiry I can- sorry to those I haven’t. This year has been no different. However, lately the resumes I’ve been receiving have a reoccurring ‘theme,’ one which is quite disturbing. Inquiries such as this:

“I’ve been out of work for a while and I’m just looking to gain experience, I’m willing to work for no compensation”

Or

 “My employment proposal would consist of me actually working in your office without being paid. I know that sounds crazy, but I think your firm and I could benefit greatly.”

 
Yes, it is crazy. No, neither I nor you will benefit. Unless you’re independently wealthy or all your bills are allowed to be paid via Monopoly money… wait… no. Under no circumstances should you work for no payment (pro bono work is a different post). The message you’re sending is that you don’t value your skills/experience and that they’re of no value to someone else. If you have no value, you’re of no benefit to me. If you’re just looking to gain experience by not being paid, you’re on the path to a bad experience. You may as well state “I want you to teach me for free so some other firm can benefit.” You’ll leave as soon as a firm offers to pay you. Benefit to me, I don’t think so.

2014-02-04_blog_image_pay to play

There is no benefit to me. If I’m not paying you what obligations do you have to me for valuing your work? What incentive do I have to teach you anything, I’m not investing in you or your skill set. You have no obligations to me. If you’re not compensated for work you do, what does that say about how you value yourself? Why would you ever work for free? What’s in it for you? An employer who allows you to work for no compensation is not invested in you, they’re using you. I don’t see any benefit for you. I don’t care how much experience you think you’ll gain, don’t do it. Do you really want experience from an employer who doesn’t value you? The answer is no. You want a firm that is willing to invest in you. When you invest a return is expected, a return with interest- interest in you.

It’s still a tough economy for the AEC profession, however, if you can’t find employment use your time to enhance your marketability. Learn new software, brush up on current building codes, enhance your knowledge of software you already know, etc. Follow firms you like via social media- join in the conversations, express interest in their work, and ask questions. If you’ve been out of work, what have you been doing and figure out how to take those experiences and market them as a valuable asset. Have you started a blog, learned a new skill, have a new hobby, etc. Market your skills and experiences as valuable, and to their fullest extent. Because honestly, the inquiry’s I receive about working for free don’t get considered by me. You don’t value yourself so what value should I have for you, harsh, but it’s true. Get out there and sell yourself, and by sell I mean you expect to be paid to play.

 

Design On,

** No, I’m not hiring… but hope to soon.

A few weeks ago I dropped blinds off for repair. The ‘ladders’- strings that operate the blinds- had broken on one side and needed to be re-strung. It would have been cheaper to buy new blinds than repair. However, the blinds have a bit of age, are for a French door (odd size), and needed to match adjacent blinds. I thought about repairing them myself, but I didn’t want to deal with the aggravation. So I fired up the old interweb machine and searched for a blind repair company- not as easy to find as one would think, there aren’t many.

2014-01-21_blog_image_blindsided

*Note to self, apply to be on Shark Tank with a blind repair company… I’m seeking $327.00 for 21% equity- “Yes, that’s correct I value the company at $1,557.14” Mark Cuban would be all up in that biz!

I found a window treatment shop within a few miles of my house. I removed the blinds and went to the shop. I spoke with the owner/salesperson/repair person, after she inspected the blinds she told me they’d be repaired and ready tomorrow- it was Monday. “I’ll call tomorrow morning to inform you when
they’re done and what time to pick them up.” I thought great, that was easy.

Tuesday came and went and I had forgotten about the blinds. Wednesday came. Wednesday afternoon came. Late Wednesday afternoon came. Nothing, no phone call. I called early evening and I’m informed that she was extremely busy and didn’t get to them. “I’ll do it first thing Thursday morning.” I thought, no big deal, things happen.

Thursday afternoon I call, nope didn’t get to it. First thing Friday morning, for sure they’ll be done. Friday afternoon I call, goes straight to voicemail, I leave a message. Late Friday afternoon I get a call, I’m told the blinds are done; I can pick them up anytime… really any time, how about this past Tuesday.

The blinds weren’t as important as it sounds. In fact, I could’ve done without the blinds for a few weeks- although my neighbors may disagree. However, I was given a commitment that wasn’t followed through with.

It’s a simple trait, and one to strive for in both your personal and professional life- do what you say you will do when you say you will do it. It conveys commitment and trust- traits I want to be known for, both personally and professionally. In addition, I want to interact with people who feel and do the same, you should as well.

 

Design On,

** The initial title of this post was The Blind Side, but Sandra wasn’t having that… So then I changed it to Blind Melon, however, that seemed a disservice to Mr. Hoon.